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What Are Signs of Miscarriage at 6 Weeks?

Miscarriages most often happen at early stages of pregnancy, sometimes even before the women had any idea she is even pregnant. The cause of early miscarriage is mostly a genetic problem with the baby. The best way to know if you are pregnant or if you have had a miscarriage is to visit your doctor for medical examination. It might also be wise to know the signs of miscarriage at 6 weeks so you have an idea of when to seek medical assistance.

Possible Signs of an Early Miscarriage

1. Bleeding

Spotting is normal during pregnancy though the amount of blood is usually quite low, much less than in the regular menstrual cycle. There are instances, however, where bleeding may indicate a miscarriage. Look out for the following symptoms.

  • Heavy flow of blood
  • Quick, sudden bleeding
  • Bleeding that does not subside
  • Bright red or brown blood; or blood that contains tissue or clots

2. Cramping

Cramping is very common during implantation. However, there are occasions where it may be a cause for concern. The following signs may point to a miscarriage.

  • Cramping is more intense and painful than regular menstrual cramping
  • Cramping can be felt strongly in your back
  • Cramping remains persistent
  • You experience vaginal bleeding (light or heavy) whilst cramping

Note

If you are experiencing severe, sharp and/or intense pain in one side of your abdomen, an ectopic pregnancy may have occurred. This refers to the condition when the fetus develops outside the uterus. It can be potentially life threatening. Make it imperative to call an ambulance or go to the closest A&E if you suspect an ectopic pregnancy may have occurred.

3. White-Pink Mucus

Expulsion of white-pink mucus from your vagina might be one of the signs of miscarriage at 6 weeks. If you experience this, you should seek medical assistance. Use an air tight container to store the mucus for medical examination. The mucus could possibly be tissue from the placenta and an indication of a miscarriage. 

4. Other Symptoms

When being pregnant, your body goes under a lot of changes. You should pay close attention to your body at this time and look out for the following symptoms.

  • Sudden disappearance of symptoms of pregnancy (missed menstrual periods, nausea, frequent urination and sensitivity to food, etc.)
  • Unexplained/unexpected weight loss
  • An overall feeling that there may be something wrong with your pregnancy

Other Women’s Experience on Miscarriage at 6 Weeks

“I experienced a miscarriage six weeks into my pregnancy. I had chronic back ache for around four weeks and brown discharge for a couple of weeks which later turned bright red. There were clots in my blood but they subsided after a day or so.”

“I too had a miscarriage around six weeks during my pregnancy. I was experiencing bad contractions and a heavy loss of blood. I was unaware of the signs of miscarriage at 6 weeks, but after visiting the hospital, a miscarriage was confirmed.”

“Throughout the whole process of my first pregnancy, I was experiencing bad signs, cramping and bleeding, etc. The worst happened around the sixth week. Miscarriage was confirmed by my doctor.”

How to Deal with Early Miscarriage

An early miscarriage will result in the expulsion of tissue which might be similar to menstrual bleeding. It may be wise to stock up on sanitary pads and bed liners as well as to ensure that you have someone to support you through this tough time. There are also treatment options available that can fix any possible complications and help ease the discomfort. 

After a suspected miscarriage, you should pay a visit to a health care professional. Ensure that all of the tissues have been expelled from the uterus. If it is not naturally expelled, specialized medication or surgery may be necessary. After treatment has taken place, recovery takes around one month to six weeks when you will resume your natural menstrual cycle. It is important to know the signs of miscarriage at 6 weeks so you are able to determine when to seek treatment. 

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